1. what’s worse,

    spending childhood in an environment that gaslit the queer out of me, or spending childhood in an environment that gaslit the neurodivergence out of me?

     
  2. tourettestoucan:

Slight exaggeration for the sake of humor.
Mod note: FAAB: female assigned at birth. Cis woman: FAAB who identifies as a woman.
Also, I have not experienced this at all, but I’ll post the submission anyway lmao.

Believe it or not, there’s actually a published paper about this. (I’ve managed to track a full text print copy down before… the methods they use of measuring gender dysphoria are kinda weird.) But yes, I don’t think I’ve ever met a straight cis female ticqueur. :P (Not that I know that many other people with TS… but still.)

    tourettestoucan:

    Slight exaggeration for the sake of humor.

    Mod note: FAAB: female assigned at birth. Cis woman: FAAB who identifies as a woman.

    Also, I have not experienced this at all, but I’ll post the submission anyway lmao.

    Believe it or not, there’s actually a published paper about this. (I’ve managed to track a full text print copy down before… the methods they use of measuring gender dysphoria are kinda weird.) But yes, I don’t think I’ve ever met a straight cis female ticqueur. :P (Not that I know that many other people with TS… but still.)

     
  3. What is ableist discourse according to Feministe?

    eateroftrees:

    allies-person:

    The Feministe Comments policy contains this clause:

    We will do what is possible to prevent publishing comments that are racist, sexist, ableist, homophobic, or transphobic. (Italics in original)

    I’m hardly the first to point out that this often does not happen. (Moreover, sometimes the bigoted comments are from the original post.)

    I have repeatedly pointed out that mainstream feminists’ recent inclusion of ableism as a category of difference and oppression is oftentimes extremely shallow.  They may have gotten the basic message of “don’t say the r-word, or lame, or crazy” (though sometimes not), but in terms of actually comprehending the disability rights critique of society, able feminists just haven’t gotten it.

    The recent prenatal screening fuckery post demonstrates this in particular stark ways.  (WARNING: LINK HAS MASSIVE ABLEISM IN COMMENTS)

    With a handful of noted exceptions, the comments are pretty much a clusterfuck of ableism.  While the preponderance of ableism is directed at people with intellectual disabilities, and specifically Down’s Syndrome, many other disabled people are also denigrated in this thread.  (There’s an ignorant as fuck comment about cochlear implants, dehumanizing descriptions of autistic people and people with physical and sensory disabilities, and in general the commentariat suggests that it would be better if society didn’t have any PWD at all.  Many very basic disability rights principles, including the idea that ableism is even a problem at all, are questioned to varying extents.)

    In summarizing the crap said about people with DS and intellectual disabilities, I hardly know where to begin.  People who attempted to point out the perspectives of people with DS are dismissed as not being truly representative.  (Apparently, the only people capable of being objective about what it’s like to live with DS are non-disabled people who don’t have a close relationship to a person with DS, whose knowledge base is reading the Wikipedia article.)  The idea that people with intellectual disabilities could ever lead fulfilling lives is outright disdained, despite many protests to the contrary.  People generally accept the idea that people with DS can’t participate in families that bind families together, including art, music, literature, and travel.  It is suggested that of course it is completely reasonable and non-ableist for a parent to expect that their prospective child enjoys analyzing the works of George Orwell as much as the parent does.  (What happens if a non-disabled child doesn’t much care for Orwell or literary analysis isn’t addressed.)

    There are more examples, I’m sure, but I really don’t want to reread the thread in order to find them.

    Remember, Feministe tells us that they will do what is possible to prevent ableist comments!  Yet no moderator does anything about either the content or tone of comments.  (People who expressed consternation about the ableism among commentators, myself included, were treated quite viciously.)  Nothing.  Not even one single comment.

    But wait.  As it turns out, today one commentator—someone who was arguing against the ableist consensus—was reprimanded for being ableist.  This person repeatedly used “Tourette’s” as an insult.  Obviously, this is completely inappropriate and ableist.  But even in reprimanding this person, the Feministe mod indicated a poor understanding of why this comment is problematic.  According to her, this was a problem because “it makes light of a serious condition.”  (Thank you for medicalizing disability, BTW.)  That’s not the main problem.  The main problem with the comment, and others of the same ilk, is that it uses disability as an insult.  That is a far greater problem than the sanctimonious TAB crap.

    While I absolutely condemn the Tourette’s remark, it was far from the most offensive thing on the thread.  Very, very far.  So for this to be the only ableist comment that is mentioned by the moderators seems rather peculiar.  They didn’t even issue a general warning to commentators writ large.

    But while this may seem rather odd superficially, it’s actually not.  This is par for the course for mainstream feminists.  They’ll acknowledge ableism in only the most superficial of ways.  When it comes to really recognizing the pervasiveness of ableism, they not only don’t get it—they actively contribute to it.

    Oh good I’m not the only person who hates the “SERIOUS CONDITION” rhetoric around disabilities. (/largely unrelated to the rest of the post.  Which is also good)

    what. someone seriously insisted Tourette’s is a serious condition. lolwhat.

    between that and all of the “OH MY GOD THINK OF THE ABLE-BODIED NEUROTYPICAL WOMEN” going on in that thread, I have officially lost all my faith in mainstream feminism.

    (yes I think TS jokes are crass and bad but that’s because it makes people view us ticqueurs in a stereotyped, inaccurate, and demeaning manner. not because it’s somehow a “serious condition” I mean lolwut it’s so totally not.)

     
  4. insane-in-the-meninges:

Bupropion (trade name: Wellbutrin, Zyban, Aplezin) is an aminoketone antidepressant and smoking cessation aid. It’s an atypical antidepressant, as it is much unlike the tricyclic SSRI or SNRI antidepressants.
The biggest criticism of bupropion is the decreased seizure threshold, resulting in a higher occurrence of seizures in some patients.

I’ve always wondered why it’s so non-abuse-prone for a substituted cathinone.
I’ve also wondered why it gave me tics from hell, but I think that’s easier to answer.

    insane-in-the-meninges:

    Bupropion (trade name: Wellbutrin, Zyban, Aplezin) is an aminoketone antidepressant and smoking cessation aid. It’s an atypical antidepressant, as it is much unlike the tricyclic SSRI or SNRI antidepressants.

    The biggest criticism of bupropion is the decreased seizure threshold, resulting in a higher occurrence of seizures in some patients.

    I’ve always wondered why it’s so non-abuse-prone for a substituted cathinone.

    I’ve also wondered why it gave me tics from hell, but I think that’s easier to answer.

     
  5. ad-hoc:

    ‘(I) Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

    (A) marked impairments in the use of multiple verbal behaviors such as literal language and honesty to regulate social interaction

    (B) failure to develop peer relationships with non-neurotypical…

    I liked this up until they started bagging on TS. Attention people: don’t invalidate one kind of neurodivergence to make your point about another kind of neurodivergence. People with TS may not consider themselves neurotypical (I don’t), and may have similar social and sensory problems (relative to a neurotypical-dominated society) as people with autism. But nope, I guess jokes about Tourette syndrome win over accurate social analysis every time.

     
  6. crying and hissing and spitting and flapping my hands for 2 straight minutes

    apparently this is the way that I express negative emotions. I should remember this for future reference. it is quite cathartic and pleasant and useful?

     
  7. thestoryofabipolarbear:

    Bipolar disorder is not like being on your period.

    It is far worse than teenage hormones.

    It is not like the change of weather patterns.

    OCD is not like being a neat freak.

    It shouldn’t be used lightly.

    It is not a joke.

    ADHD is not like having a sugar high.

    It is a learning diability.

    Hyperactive is just one of the symptoms of the three.

    And Tourette syndrome is not cursing a lot. Nor is it saying socially inappropriate things.

     
  8. What does it really mean to be neither autistic nor neurotypical?

    My tics are increasing. If this pattern continues stimming and hypersensitivity will probably become a problem for me this quarter. (Not that stimming itself is a problem, but the way people react to it usually is.) But I feel like I’m not really allowed to complain about that or claim that’s an issue, because my TS is “mild” (according to whoever it is who gets to decide these things) and I’m not being treated for it (nevermind that the real reason for that is my insurance doesn’t cover the only TS clinic in the city).

    On the one hand being raised to think everything about me is ‘normal’ is a very good thing, because it means that I wasn’t stigmatized (not much anyway) for acting in ways that come naturally to me. I know a lot of people can’t say the same. On the other hand, it means that I feel like I’m faking it or overdramatizing for bringing up what are very real issues to me, and that my concerns are dismissed as hypochondria.

     
  9. This seems related to why Tourette syndrome is not a protective factor from Parkinsons disease or parkinsonism more generally.

     
  10. ughhrandomshit:

me, minus depression.

The problem with Venn diagrams containing 4 circles is that they can’t actually represent all possible intersections (at least, not if you’re committed to staying 2-dimensional). I like this diagram, but this problem means it can’t represent the overlap between tic disorders and mood disorders where ADHD and OCD are not present—-not that that overlap is thought by most TS researchers to be neurologically relevant anyway.
(See also the drugs Venn diagram that implicitly claimed antidepressant-hallucinogens must all be stimulants or depressants; IIRC the selective serotonin releasing agents provide a counterexample to that, at least if entactogens are counted as a subset of hallucinogens.)
Have I overanalyzed this enough yet? :P

    ughhrandomshit:

    me, minus depression.

    The problem with Venn diagrams containing 4 circles is that they can’t actually represent all possible intersections (at least, not if you’re committed to staying 2-dimensional). I like this diagram, but this problem means it can’t represent the overlap between tic disorders and mood disorders where ADHD and OCD are not present—-not that that overlap is thought by most TS researchers to be neurologically relevant anyway.

    (See also the drugs Venn diagram that implicitly claimed antidepressant-hallucinogens must all be stimulants or depressants; IIRC the selective serotonin releasing agents provide a counterexample to that, at least if entactogens are counted as a subset of hallucinogens.)

    Have I overanalyzed this enough yet? :P

     
  11. agirlcalledhome:

    Well….

    • “What’s wrong with you?!”
    • “But retarded is a medical word!”
    • “I totally can’t tell you’re autistic!”
    • “You’re not depressed, you’re just having a bad day!”
    • “Stop that! It’s inappropriate!”
    • “Well my cousin’s sister’s brother-in-law’s nephew’s brother is autistic, so I’m an expert!”

    "What’s wrong with your arm?" Nothing’s wrong, I’m just ticcing!

    pretty sure I’ve gotten more comments than that on my tics but that’s the one that comes up by far the most often.

    fortunately I haven’t gotten any “oh, you’re so brave and noble and inspirational to have made it this far with Tourette syndrome” kind of bullshit. I really don’t want to end up being “that ~inspirational~ mathematician with Tourette syndrome” though, which is why I like never talk about TS.

    also people suggesting I take medication for TS… no, just no. no slight on those who do, but… I’m not taking typical antipsychotics unless I legitimately have to (as an amateur psychopharmacologist I can recite off the top of my head the battery of common and unpleasant side effects, very few of which I’d be willing to risk to treat tics even if they weren’t all combined into one sucky dysphoric package) and I see TS as more of a variation than something that “needs to be cured/treated”.

    everyone else has already admirably covered the myriad stigma-perpetuating comments that people with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, ocd, etc get.

    also comments on my hypermobility being ‘freakish’/’disgusting’/’nauseating’, “why can’t you hold a pen properly” etc, but I don’t really consider that a disability because I don’t have any of the social consequences wrt pain, mobility, etc that people with hypermobility syndromes tend to have.

     
  12. ah, I remember these. gave me tics from hell but god I was flying high mood-wise.

    ah, I remember these. gave me tics from hell but god I was flying high mood-wise.